vitiligo

10 Ways You Can Step Up for Vitiligo, Right Now

In March 2016, the Vitiligo Working Group launched the “Step Up For Vitiligo” campaign, a movement created to build vitiligo awareness and support – and it’s time for you to step up too. Named to reflect the need for action in the vitiligo community, the campaign encourages people to “step up” for vitiligo – as advocates, awareness raisers, ambassadors and supporters.

So how can you step up for vitiligo? Here are ten ways to get started:

Smile when people stare and offer to tell them about vitiligo

It’s simple and effective – when you see someone looking at your skin, smile and ask if you can tell them about vitiligo. It takes some courage, but it goes a long way to building awareness about vitiligo when everyone in the vitiligo community steps up. Each and every interaction you have with someone who hasn’t seen vitiligo before leaves a lasting impression – and has the opportunity to gain another friend and supporter of the vitiligo community.

Share the “Vitiligo: Truth, Hope and Change” YouTube video with your network

At the center of the Step Up for Vitiligo campaign is the award-winning video “Vitiligo: Truth, Hope and Change.” Featuring powerful stories from vitiligo doctors and patients, the video explains the state of vitiligo today – who has it, what it is and how to treat it, and how emotionally and psychologically devastating it can be. If you’ve ever struggled to help your friends and family understand what you’re going through, this video will do it for you – and raise awareness at the same time.

Spread awareness on social media with #StepUp4Vitiligo

Sharing a picture on social media? Add the hashtag #StepUp4Vitiligo to support the campaign, increase awareness and help others in vitiligo community connect with you. It’s an easy way of educating others about your condition when they see the hashtag. Bonus points if you add other leading hashtags like #Vitiligo, #VitiligoNation and #TeamVitiligo.

Join or start a local support vitiligo group

Vitiligo support groups are local communities of those with vitiligo who meet throughout the year as a support and educational network. For example, the New York Vitiligo Community meetings include updates from dermatologists, time for introductions, and guest speakers who talk about anything from mental health to journaling and makeup. You can find existing support groups at http://www.vitiligoworkinggroup.com/support-groups.

Donate to the cause through various vitiligo non-profits and research organizations 

Every day, there are hundreds of doctors, researchers, lobbyists and patients at work for the vitiligo community – and they need your help. Whether you donate to a nonprofit that provides support group networks, a research lab working to find a cure, or a global support group that advocates on behalf of those with vitiligo, your donation will go a long way to helping the vitiligo community. To see some of the organizations that take donations, visit our recent Holiday Guide to Giving.

Sign the petition at WWW.25JUNE.ORG asking the United Nations to officially recognize June 25 as World Vitiligo Day

The vitiligo community celebrates World Vitiligo Day on June 25, but it has yet to be officially recognized as a global day by the United Nations. The vitiligo community is trying to change that. A letter to the UN Secretary-General on www.25june.org asks the UN to both designate June 25 as World Vitiligo Day and to provide support for vitiligo healthcare and education. With over 500,000 signatures, the petition has is well on its way, but needs your help. Sign the petition today and ask your friends and family to sign too.

Write your local government officials to raise awareness in your own community

We need elected officials at every level – city hall, school board, governors, state legislators, senators and the president – to be aware of what vitiligo is; to understand that we need more money for research; to influence insurance companies to see it as a disease instead of a cosmetic issue so that it will be covered by insurance; to put money towards raising awareness through public service announcements; and to increase information in schools to end bullying. You can help raise awareness by writing a letter to your local elected official or visiting them in person through town hall meetings or one-on-one appointments.

Host a fundraiser and donate the proceeds to research or a support group

The vitiligo community needs funds for research, events like World Vitiligo Day, awareness campaigns like the “Vitiligo: Truth, Hope and Change” video and more. Host a bake sale, car wash, dinner, 5K race or any other type of event to raise funds that can be donated to a non-profit or support group of your choice. Start by reaching out to dermatology offices or support groups in your area to build support for the event. Find a cause to raise funds for. And then get planning!

Volunteer your time and talents to non-profits and support groups

Help the vitiligo community by doing what you’re good at! Are you a natural-born leader? Start a local support group. Are you an event planner? Host a fundraiser. Are you a photographer? Take pictures for Living Dappled’s blog. Are you familiar with advocacy? Go to Capitol Hill and lobby or get in touch with your local government officials. Are you good with a camera? Create a documentary about life with vitiligo. Are you good at customer service? Volunteer to help at next year’s World Vitiligo Day. The opportunities are endless and together we can make a difference.

Share your own story with media, through vitiligo blogs and on social media

According to John Harris, director of the University of Massachusetts Vitiligo Clinic and Research Center, everything that needs to be done for vitiligo patients, including funding, research and lobbying, comes back to raising awareness by telling the stories of people with vitiligo – including your story. Share your experience with vitiligo by reaching out to a local newspaper; posting photos on social; or contacting local nonprofit organizations and blogs like Living Dappled.

Photo by Instagram user @amalgame69.

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Erika Page

Erika Page is a writer and blogger with universal vitiligo. Her first spots appeared on her spine when she was seven years old and today vitiligo covers her entire body. Based just south of Washington, D.C., Erika founded Living Dappled to create a community of inspiration and hope for girls and women living with vitiligo.

2 Comments

  1. Pearl Dodoo

    I want to start a Vitiligo support group iny local ares in Canada but don’t know how to start it. I have been living with Vitiligo for 26years now. It started when I was 18 years. It started as a patch on my lips and foot but as years goes by , my whole body was covered. I have spent so many years covering up by putting on long sleeves, trousers, putting on makeep and now I have come to a point iny journey that all I want to do is to raise an awareness to the public.
    I have learnt to love who I am and the beautiful person I am. Humiliations and bullying from loved ones had madee stronger and all I want to do is to go all out for Vitiligo.

    • Erika Page

      Pearl, thanks for writing! One of the easiest ways to start a support group is to go through VitFriends, a support group organization that has chapters around the United States and might be open to starting one in Canada. You can reach them at support@vitfriends.org.

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