nutritionist with vitiligo shares tips

4 Health and Wellness Tips from a Nutritionist with Vitiligo

New year, new juice cleanse? Think again, says Breanne Rice, a holistic nutritionist who has had vitiligo on her face since she was 19 years old. Joining the hosts of Make Shift Happen Radio this week to discuss health and wellness, Breanne shared that she has never done a juice cleanse – and doesn’t recommend them.

“A juice cleanse is more like glorified starvation,” said Breanne on the show. “If you focus on putting the right foods in your body, you’ll be detoxing year-round and won’t need to do a food cleanse.”

A holistic nutritionist, Breanne’s health journey started when digestive issues influenced her to overhaul her diet. The change not only healed her gut, but slowed the progression of the vitiligo on her face. Today Breanne works one-on-one with clients to help them understand how food impacts their body and build a healthier diet.

Calling in from rainy Seattle, she shared four of her tips for a healthier 2018 with the audience:

Get an expert opinion

When it comes to food and nutrition, there’s no one-size-fits-all. And that’s where professionals like Breanne come into the picture. Getting a personalized, holistic evaluation completed by an expert gives you the chance to find out what works for your body. According to Breanne, this is where a lot of people go wrong, choosing instead to adopt trending diets that may or may not work for them. Each person is unique, and reacts to food in different ways. What’s healthy for one person might make another person sick. Sign up for a consultation with your doctor or nutritionist and see what you learn.

Opt for lifestyle changes over detoxes

Instead of going for a quick fix, think long-term and adopt a diet that will detox your body year-round, says Breanne. Since it’s the responsibility of your liver to detox your body, you want to incorporate foods that keep your liver healthy – like beets and lemons – keeping in mind that there’s no one-size-fits-all approach. If you do want to do a juice cleanse, says Breanne, try doing it alongside your regular meals instead of as a stand-alone diet.

Incorporate whole foods

Think minimally processed, non-processed, and organic foods when you head to the market or grocery store. According to Breanne, our bodies aren’t designed to break down processed foods. Rather, our bodies are built to digest nutrient-dense foods that can break down the nutrients and deliver them to our cells. So where do you start? Try switching out just one processed food item from your kitchen or pantry a week and see how it makes a difference.

Monitor your body’s response to food

Food is fuel for your body. If you don’t feel well after you eat, that’s a warning sign that something might be wrong. It’s not uncommon for people to develop allergies or intolerances to the foods they eat, even as adults. Pay attention to the foods you eat and look out for bloating, nausea, digestive issues and cramping. If you experience any of these reactions, you might need to see a doctor or nutritionist to determine which foods are causing the reaction.

Do you have more questions about nutrition? Contact Breanne Rice by visiting her website,

Has changing your diet impacted your vitiligo? Tell us in the comments below.

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Erika Page

Erika Page is a writer and blogger with universal vitiligo. Her first spots appeared on her spine when she was seven years old and today vitiligo covers her entire body. Based just south of Washington, D.C., Erika founded Living Dappled to create a community of inspiration and hope for girls and women living with vitiligo.

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